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YET ANOTHER AFTER ANOTHER AFTER ANOTHER HURRICANE FRAUD BUST

Jim Stone

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9-20-17

Guess what? In 2010 they re-defined what qualified hurricanes for category levels, and threw out the following:

In the past, the diameter of the hurricane mattered for it's rating. If it was a puny thing like Maria it would not go over category one because it does not reach out far enough and therefore lacked a high overall energy. After 2010, only the peak wind speed was considered no matter how small the area covered was, and if they could lie about that, the hurricane automatically became what they wanted. This was done to make it easier to use weather modification tech to scam for the global warming/carbon tax agenda.

Prior to 2010, the environmental effects of the hurricane counted towards it's rating. This means, for example, how much it sucked the water level down in the surrounding area, and not just it's individual storm surge height over a small area. Irma caused the ocean to recede over enormous areas as it built it's storm surge under itself. There were widespread reports about the ocean receding far away from the normal shoreline during Irma, and no such reports for Maria to date, at least none that I have seen. This is because Irma is about 1/4 the size of Jose, and Jose is less than half the size that Irma was. Cumulatively, Maria is just a baby compared to the other two.

Prior to 2010, other things were considered, such as wave height. Wave height is the result of three things. 1. Fresh or salt water - waves get higher easier in fresh water. OK, now for the other two, that matter for hurricanes. 2: Wind speed and 3. Fetch length. Huge hurricanes make huge waves with less wind speed than small hurricanes can make with higher winds. If high winds only blow on the water over a short distance, waves will not get as high as they would get if the wind blew across the water for a long distance.

Maria had pathetic short waves. 25 feet is NOTHING for a hurricane, in fact, 25 feet is so short that Maria clearly did not qualify as a major hurricane. Even a category 1 hurricane should push waves up to 70 feet or more. Yet 25 foot waves are what hit Puerto Rico, and that speaks volumes.

AND HERE IS EXACTLY WHY MARIA DID NOT PRODUCE ANY OF THE EFFECTS YOU'D EXPECT FROM A HURRICANE, OTHER THAN WINDS THAT ARE EASILY DISPUTED: