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JUDGE ANNA VON REITZ: Color Code the Judges


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Color Code the Judges


By Anna Von Reitz

December 31st 2017



I have served as a "Justice" for the Alaska State Superior Court and as a "Judge" for the Postal District Court, so I have some basis in practical knowledge of what courts are and what the jurisdictions are and how things are supposed to work----and don't.


Technically, all land jurisdiction judges are called "Justices" as in "Justice of the Peace" and as "Supreme Court Justice". 


All sea jurisdiction judges are called "Judge" or "Magistrate". 


In the weird world of privatized corporate government the judicial system is as messed up as any other, and it rapidly gets difficult to tell who is acting in what capacity and in what jurisdiction.  There is also a nasty practice of overlapping and deliberately operating multiple jurisdictions at once in the same courtroom that needs to stop.


So how about this suggestion? 


Require the justices to wear green robes --- dark green for the Postal District Court serving the international land jurisdiction, and medium green for the County and State Superior and Supreme Courts.  Green adequately symbolizes the land jurisdiction, so that courts set aside to serve the living people can be readily and surely identified and operated without any questions.


Require the judges to wear blue robes --- dark blue with gold braid for martial courts, dark blue without braid for Admiralty courts, and light blue for Maritime court officials.  The gold braid is an adequate symbol of military authority and the dark blue and light blue both adequately symbolize sea/water jurisdictions. 


Adopting such conventions would put an end to confusion and provide an explicit external sign of the jurisdiction and nature of the court.  It will also prevent judges from usurping into or pretending to serve other jurisdictions, so that people can instantly identify the presumptions under which they are being addressed.